Addendum to “Chemo Nails”: Healing

I can’t write about discolored and infected fingernails as a side effect of chemotherapy without throwing in some good news too. Not only did I document the sad state of my nails in photos, I kept taking pictures even after the ER visit. I wanted to see what the healing process looked like, something that can be difficult if you don’t have photographs to compare against. So what’s the good news? That which was nasty didn’t stay nasty.

(About the photos…I never intended to post these so they aren’t the greatest images, and I’m still a dork when it comes to working with WordPress, so I apologize for the weird sizing. Eventually I’ll figure it out.)

September 6, 2017: the left hand again with bruising visible on the side of the ring finger. Its nail looked like it was about to drop off, but it was actually holding on quite well, not that I was about to fiddle with it to find out. From this angle the middle finger looked black with an uncertain future. The left hand looked like it had been on the losing side of a bar flight. Nonetheless, my poor body, still recovering from the shock of chemo, was hard at work getting everything back in order.

September 6, 2017: just over a week after my ER visit, the left ring finger was normal-sized again but clearly showing the damage from the infection in the form of a significant bruise. The middle finger wasn’t looking that hot either.
September 6, 2017: in the meantime, the right hand was shaking off the chemo infusions. While it seemed like the nail beds had shrunk, the growing nails were doing well.

A week had passed since my infection had been treated (see previous post), I was still alive (a good thing!) and my nails hadn’t fallen off. My right hand, ignoring the battles of the left, was marching onward and away from chemo memories.

As I mentioned in my last post, I was wondering how much influence the vinegar and water solution that I soaked all my raw veggies in to clean them (per doctor’s orders!) had on the state of my right hand. It had spent much more time in that solution, at least several times a day, and didn’t show nearly the same amount of damage that the left hand had.

A week later, instead of nails dropping off one by one, the healing continued.

September 13, 2017: this photo offers a better view of how much the left ring finger had healed over the course of two weeks. Even after having a seriously suppressed immune system, recovery from the infection progressed remarkably quickly.
September 13, 2017: still hanging on. While the nails looked horrible, there was actually considerable improvement.
October 19, 2017: the right hand was looking almost completely normal!
October 19, 2017: a month after the photos above, healing is well on its way. I didn’t lose a single nail, the dark discoloration disappeared and everything was growing.

While nails do take a while to get rid of the damage they sustained, almost two months after the infection and about two and a half months following my last chemo infusion, they no longer screamed, “chemo patient!”

October 24, 2017: …and the right hand looked normal enough that you wouldn’t have thought anything had happened…if you hadn’t seen my scalp, the hair on which took its sweet time coming in. But that’s another post altogether.
October 24, 2017: a week later, after a good nail clipping, the left hand was no longer scaring children and small animals. I felt human again!

My nails served an important function, because I could use them as a visible indicator that things were, in fact, changing and recovery was truly taking place. That meant a lot to me as I awaited the return of my hair, a process that did not come as quickly as I’d been led to believe from the stories of others. But my nail journey was also something else: a reminder that everything awful, even the fear and pain and bruises from cancer, would eventually fade.

Author: franticshanti

Why so serious?

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