1975-2019

Unbeknownst to me, the friend whom I wrote about in “Waiting To Say Goodbye” had already passed by the time I posted last Saturday. The end came very rapidly but peacefully Friday at sundown, allowing just enough time to enable her to be surrounded by everyone in her immediate family.

This is sudden and painful. She and I had spent a good chunk of 2017 sharing breast cancer treatment experiences. We knew that there were no guarantees with cancer, but we both had hope. Neither one of us imagined that this would be one of the outcomes.

After she knew her cancer had spread, she continued living as she always had, toughing through the hard parts. She didn’t want people asking her how she was feeling, she wanted to keep on going until she couldn’t go anymore, and that’s what she did. Her decline was so swift that she had felt well enough to do everything normally until the last few days before her passing. That was a beautiful gift that she genuinely deserved.

Understanding that nothing in this life is permanent doesn’t make her death any easier to accept, although it does underscore how things change no matter how desperately we cling to them. I strive to practice non-attachment, but who am I kidding? I am too attached to people and expectations. Yes, it does cause suffering, but right now suffering is just what I do.

Eventually I may transcend this. Eventually.

I end this post with a quote from Claire Wineland, the 21-year-old cystic fibrosis activist who passed away from complications from lung transplant surgery on September 2, 2018. She had spent most of her days knowing that her time on this Earth was short and urged people to live life to the fullest: “Go enjoy it, ’cause there are people fighting like hell for it.”

The Long And Short Of It: Hair Through Chemo And Beyond, Part 2

Part 1 of this series chronicled the loss of my hair to chemo and subsequent gradual regrowth through the end of 2017. Part 2 is the “beyond” part of “chemo and beyond”. These photos are somewhat self-indulgent because, well, hair does grow and so whether I’ve got short bangs or spikey hair doesn’t really have anything to do with chemo. Nonetheless, I wanted to provide some perspective regarding how long it takes until a cancer survivor’s head doesn’t look like a cancer survivor’s head.

I need to stress that these photos were originally taken so that I could monitor my progress, not with the intention of posting them for all to see, so the quality may be lacking.

February 6, 2018: I didn’t take photos for a number of weeks — probably because once I was convinced that my hair was growing in properly, I mellowed out about scrutinizing my scalp. This was my general look into the early part of 2018, a hat that showed the longer growth (around the back) but hid the painfully short hair on top. I had my very first post-chemo haircut in February.
February 17, 2018: This is after that first haircut. I got a trim around the ears and back, but the hairstylist left the top alone — good thing since it was still really short. I started venturing out without a hat. It was amazing to feel the breeze in my hair!
March 29, 2018: I loved this stage and got a lot of compliments about this look, in part because the hair on top was incredibly soft (all new growth!) and touchable.
April 24, 2018: A view from above showing how full the regrowth was.
April 24, 2018: A front view of the same stage.
May 19, 2018: Now we’re getting somewhere! The hair is noticeably longer and showing more weight.
June 27, 2018: The hair is getting unruly. Need a haircut soon!
August 17, 2018: This marks a little over a year after my last chemo. I got my second haircut in July, and this was the first trim on top. This was another stage that I really liked even though it had a mullet-y feel. I was channeling Rod Stewart here.
August 17, 2018: A view from the top. There was more color creeping back into my hair and it was feeling very substantial.
November 19, 2018: Fast-forward a couple of months. After some more growth, I went for my third haircut. The hairstylist was distracted and did a major chop job on my hair. A bad cut always sucks, but when you’ve gone through chemo, it’s even worse.
January 11, 2019: Almost two months after that last cut, the lack of symmetry was obvious (combed out for effect here); she had chopped off more hair from one side than the other. I waited to let it grow more so that the new stylist (not going back to the old place!) would have more to work with.
January 16, 2019: Finally, went to a highly-rated salon (should have gone there in the first place, but…) and got a cut I love!
January 17, 2019: I can spike it for a seriously edgy look, or keep it tamer so that I don’t freak out everyone at work.

And so ends this journey. What my hair looks like now is vastly different from when I began with my cancer diagnosis, but as I’ve said previously, I am not the person inside that I was before, and now my outside reflects that. After a year of treatment followed by a year of regaining my footing, I’m edgier and willing to push my boundaries. Cancer didn’t give me a choice but to move forward, and that’s what I’m doing.

The Long And Short Of It: Hair Through Chemo And Beyond, Part 1

It’s been almost a year and a half since my last chemo infusion. This past week, I treated myself to a chic haircut at a real salon (instead of going to a cheaper chain hair-cuttery) and I’m so delighted with the result. I reflected on what it took to get here, hair-wise, by going through the photos I took of this whole experience. This post series chronicles my cancer journey as witnessed by my scalp.

Please note that these photos were taken for my own records, without the expectation that I’d be posting them online, so I apologize for the quality.

May 13, 2017: My first chemo treatment was April 27th and just over two weeks later, my hair started coming out in handfuls. I had long hair so the loss was noticeable and very distressing. Time for it to come off!
My husband started by taking off the bulk of my ponytail first.
I got to live out all my punk hair dreams…
…and even spent a few minutes channeling Riff-Raff from “The Rocky Horror Picture Show.”
Finally it was done. No looking back! As miserable as it was losing my hair and crying through most of the head-shaving process, I now felt like I had a modicum of control over this whole crazy situation.
June 8, 2017: This was the day of my third chemo session. Oddly, my hair had actually grown but then seemed to freeze. If I pulled on individual hairs, they would come out easily.
Needless to say, I didn’t mess with them! While it’s not readily apparent in the photos, there’s way more bald scalp than hair there, with significant loss at the front.
July 3, 2017: Yeah, not looking so healthy here. Loads of the tiny hairs had given up and dropped out, and I was having issues with a dry, flaky scalp. Honestly, I hadn’t realized that it looked this bad until I saw the photo.
July 20, 2017: My scalp was confused. Some obstinate hairs continued to grow, but most hadn’t, giving me a great view of the horrible moles on my head!

August 18, 2017: My last chemo had been August 10th. There were only enough of these longer hairs on my head to make me look like Yoda, but without the big ears. You can see the rough shape that my nails are in (but that’s a story for another post).
September 6, 2017: There were hairs on my head, but they were not really growing in. It had been a month since my last chemo and I was hoping to see significant signs of life. But, nope.
September 16, 2017: Here’s one of those never-say-die hairs. I was also noticing downy, baby-chick hairs but no appreciable coverage. Wow, I have huge pores!
October 6, 2017: It had been almost two months since my last chemo, and I was convinced that I should be getting more growth. My hairs were super-fine and my scalp squeaked when I tried to run my fingers through them. See the light shining off my head? I could blind someone with that!
October 11, 2017: Yes, this photo was taken only 5 days after the one above it, but I was starting to get desperate and taking loads of photos. I was convinced that I should be getting more growth than I was, and had spent too much time on cancer forums reading posts by women whose hair hadn’t come back at all (bad idea!). I was experiencing growth but their fine texture made it seem like there was very little there.
October 17, 2017: At this point, there was a mixture of sparse longer hairs and the super-soft fuzz, but the overall view still screamed, “BALD!” Family members enjoyed patting my head and cooing.
November 2, 2017: Almost three months after finishing chemo, I still saw light glinting off the front of my scalp. I could wear hats because the back of my head had more hair coverage. Regrowth was happening in a sort of reverse male pattern baldness. There WERE little sprouts on the front of my head, but they were taking their own sweet time.
November 11, 2017: Finally! The hairs in front were definitely coming in. All the growth was soft and fine, but it seemed like the follicles had woken up. I found it easier to be patient now that there was definite promise of a full head of hair in my future.

Part 2 covers hair growth through 2018…

Invisible Effects: Chemo Brain

Ah, chemo brain: the eater of thoughts. I should note that what I’m experiencing might not just be the effects of chemotherapy messing with my brain cells. This could also be influenced by the estradiol-blocking drug Tamoxifen that is forcing me into menopause before my natural time, or it could simply be the menopause “fog” that women complain about. So I don’t know exactly what it is, besides being infuriating.

I lose thoughts in an instant. Sometimes I actually “see” them disappear in the distance. It’s such a weirdly tangible sensation. I can try to grasp at their coattails and occasionally I’m successful in latching onto the thoughts and pulling them back. Other times I need to stop and walk back through my thought processes to retrieve them. And then sometimes they’re just gone. My desk at work is covered with post-it notes as a testament to what’s going on in my noggin. If there’s something I need to do I need to write it down NOW, and it’s not unusual for me to lose the thought as I’m in the process of getting something to write it down on!

This is what a walk down my memory lane looks like.

I can juggle up to three things in my mind at a time if I keep repeating them over and over again and work to maintain focus. Any more than that and it quickly crosses into the realm of hopelessness — it’s like knowing how to juggle three balls but if someone tosses a fourth at you, they all crash to the ground.

Then there are those chunks of awareness that disappear. It may simply be distraction and losing focus, but it feels like a hiccup in time that I don’t notice until it’s happened. It’s that “huh?” feeling as I return to present time when I realize that I’ve been gone for a second or two.

More disconcerting is a strange myopia that prevents me from reacting normally in a familiar situation. For instance, several months ago I treated a red light like a stop sign, and this was a familiar traffic light in my neighborhood that I’d been through many times. I briefly stopped at it, then drove through it. It was a “T” intersection that’s not terribly busy, but I did get shocked back to reality by the angry honk of a car that had the green and was probably wondering WTF I was doing. 

The bottom line is that I’m distractable beyond belief. My train of thought gets derailed before it even leaves the station. The first time I noticed this, my oncologist ordered a brain MRI, way back in February. Nope, couldn’t blame it on a brain tumor — it’s just chemo brain.

This feels demoralizing, especially since my memory used to be so good. I lament losing all those awesome thoughts and ideas. And I know they were awesome because I remember having them — I just can’t recall exactly what they were. Yeah, there will be more, but I better have a notepad nearby to write them down. I even had a better ending for this post, but, you know…

I Didn’t Expect THAT: Surgical Glue

This was one of the nicest surprises that I received throughout all of treatment.

Growing up, I always associated surgery with umpteen stitches that required removal. Then again, I also associated cancer with certain death. Luckily, neither one is a definite anymore. Since I’d never needed major surgery before, I had no idea that surgical glue is a thing. And what a thing it is! It would have probably been different if I’d had a mastectomy, but with a simple lumpectomy to remove a not-so-big tumor…all the stitches were dissolvable and internal.

Armpit_glue
A view of my armpit after my surgery. The top scar is lymph node excision, the bottom is lumpectomy. The shiny stuff is glue. Yay, no bandages needed and no stitches to remove!

On the outside, there was glue. It was plastic-y, kind of like if someone had taken nail polish and drawn a stripe across the incision, only it was more pliable. As my incisions healed, the glue flaked off. There were no dressings to change, no bandages necessary at all. Not having external stitches was a beautiful gift from my surgeon.

If you’ve read my other posts, you’ll know that psychologically I didn’t handle the concept of cancer well. It took me on an anxiety-fueled roller-coaster ride, as I went from a healthy, active woman to a cancer patient. I have a stubborn expectation of normality in my life, and over the years I’ve put a lot of work into maintaining it. Cancer blew that to shreds. And in a funny way, that little strip of glue brought a bit of “normal” back to me.

Sometimes, it’s the little things…

 

Addendum to So.Many.Pills

My last post (I Didn’t Expect THAT: So.Many.Pills) was about the overwhelming number of medications associated with cancer treatment, particularly for someone not used to taking pills. But this topic deserves a closer look…

If I had to choose one of the most frightening aspects of cancer treatment, it would be side effects. This is not like popping an aspirin for a headache. These are medications that can take a heavy toll. One of my greatest sources of anxiety was deciding whether to take a pill or try to “tough it out”.

After surgery, I was given a generic form of something approximating Norco. Some people jokingly commented that this was a “perk” of treatment, but I had read the insert that came with the medication and wanted nothing to do with it. The only reason that I took it (a single half dose) was that by the evening I had a horrible headache, more painful than anything at the surgery site and probably due to a combination of the anesthesia and not being able to drink coffee that morning.

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Just…no.

It was a miserable night, since the half dose didn’t do much and I tossed in bed, googling interactions between my pill and ibuprofin, which is what I really wanted to take but hadn’t due to potential bleeding issues. At about 5am, satisfied that enough time had passed from my half dose of pain reliever, I took the ibuprofin and finally got some sleep. Wish I’d taken it first instead of the “oooo-you’re-so-lucky” Norco.

Nausea from chemo was another terrifying thought. The nurses had warned me not to risk it; if I started to feel queasy, take anti-nausea meds. Once vomiting sets in, I was told, it was hard to stop. Of course, the side effects associated with the meds were rather extensive and just reading the label made me anxious. There were two different meds and the idea was this: take the first one (ondonsetron) and then if I need a booster in four hours, take the second one (prochlorperazine). And then alternate like that every four hours, if necessary.

Sounds reasonable, except that a couple of nights after my first infusion I mixed up the pills and ended up taking prochlorperazine first. Prochlorperazine is an anti-psychotic (I guess, with anti-nausea properties?) and it was responsible for one of the roughest nights of my life. It was that night that I swore I’d pierced the veil between this world and the next and decided that death was a fair alternative to what I was feeling.

Somehow, I survived those first nights, but I wasn’t keen to go through that again.

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Not a perfect solution, but better than the alternatives.

I live in a state that has legalized cannabis, and was sent a shipment of CBD cookies by one of my brothers who had used them to control nausea from migraines. I was encouraged to try them since I was told CBD didn’t have side effects. Of course, as I mentioned in the previous post, it also didn’t have clear dosing guidelines. I mean, this was a crumbly cookie – how do you dose that? My brother said something like, “I take a couple when I get a migraine.” My brother is also 6’3″. I figured I’d start with one.

Shortly after that, I fell into a weird sleep from which, an hour later, I woke with a gasp because I thought I’d stopped breathing. Mmmm, probably not the right dose for me. Four hours after I’d consumed the cookie I needed to pick up my son from school. I wasn’t high, of course, but I wasn’t feeling normal either. I made it there and back alive. It was at that point that I realized having to play mom while going through cancer treatment just plain sucked, but I digress…

Eventually I worked out a dose, about 1/5 to 1/4 of a cookie, which was 20-25 mg of CBD. This was a game-changer for me and I gratefully relied on CBD for the remainder of my treatment. Yes, I truly disliked the taste, and with the lining of my GI tract gone, eating a cookie was not first on my list but being able to calm my nausea without side effects was well worth it. It probably helped my anxiety too.

What it would have been like to go through treatment without being so fearful of what the medications were doing to me? Anxiety always got the best of me. As noted in my last post, getting to the point where I could limit the number of medications I took was key in helping me get through this experience.

While the physical effects were rough, the psychological effects were what magnified the discomfort, and that had to do with feeling so far out of my element. None of this was close to normal. Of course, my normal is not needing medications. That wasn’t happening with cancer, but once I figured out what was what and how much I could handle, treatment became more manageable.

I Didn’t Expect THAT: So.Many.Pills

I figured that there would be a lot of medication involved with cancer treatment. I just didn’t realize it would be THIS much.

I am not a big pill-taker. Besides vitamins here and there, the only thing I’d taken with any frequency had been ibuprofin, and that was only for menstrual cramps and knee pain. But then came breast cancer.

First there was Xanax, so that anxiety from my diagnosis wouldn’t cause me to lose too much weight before starting chemo. Then there were meds post-surgery: I took half a pill of generic Vicodin before switching to ibuprofin, fearful of taking anything for too long. But with chemo, I needed steroids for before/during/after to get me through the infusion’s worst effects. Then there was the chemo itself, and additional IV drugs to prevent an immediate reaction. The day after each infusion, I went in for an injection (Neulasta) to help bring my white blood cell count back up.

MyMedications
Some of my medications. Just looking at them made me feel sicker!

There were drugs to help deal with side effects. And then other drugs to handle the side effects of those drugs. I had more pills with my name on it than I’d ever had in my life. It was terrifying to me. I’d gone from being a remarkably healthy 50-something to (what felt to me like) a seriously ill patient with a life threatening disease.

In all honesty, most of these drugs I didn’t even take. While I did need the Xanax, I worked hard to reduced the dose until I parted with it completely. In its place, I meditated. After the first infusion and some unfortunate confusion regarding which anti-nausea pill to take first, resulting in one of the roughest nights of my life, I switched to CBD (cannabidiol) oil to prevent vomiting. Initially this required experimentation, as research in the area is relatively young due to an evolving legal landscape, resulting in lack of reliable dosing guidelines. But once I got that down, CBD eliminated the need for a myriad other medications because it didn’t have side effects.

Even the Claritin, which I was told to take for bone pain commonly associated with the Neulasta shots, was unnecessary. I took it for a while until I realized that I wasn’t experiencing significant pain and could do without it.

Limiting medications that weren’t completely necessary didn’t have negative physical effects and, even better, benefited me psychologically. I was constantly striving for normality, and that doesn’t come easily with cancer treatment. Pill-popping was an unfamiliar concept for me, so getting back to where I felt comfortable, taking as few medications as I could safely tolerate, was critical.

Unfortunately, I’m not quite done yet. The toughest part is over, but the last chapter of  my pill-taking experience includes a decade of the estradiol-blocking drug Tamoxifen. It’s a single pill I have to take on a daily basis to reduce the chances of cancer recurrence, and I deal by looking at it as an excuse to hydrate before getting out of bed every morning. Drink a bunch of water and, oh, slip that pill in there too.

I wish I didn’t even have to take the Tamoxifen. But it is what it is. I’m looking forward to the day when I can be completely pill-free, and trying to appreciate that after everything I’ve been through, there’s only one medication left.